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Stonehenge

37 36 aLternatIve Stonehenge the loony fringe of dotty archaeology Stonehenge has always attracted speculation, which reached a climactic peak in the 1960s. Unfortunately, at this time the discovery that the entire chronology of the Neolithic and Bronze Age period was hopelessly in error threw archaeologists into ferment, and they closed ranks over this invasion of their pitch. As a result, much valid research in megalithic geometry, astro nomy and metrology the units of length used by the builders was castigated, mocked or ignored. Any nonarchaeologist was automatically assumed, in Professor Atkinsons immortal phrase, to belong to the loony fringe of dotty archaeology. In 1965 Dr Hawkins published Stonehenge Decoded, Atkinson calling it Moonshine over Stonehenge. In 1967, Professor Thoms seminal Megalithic Sites in Britain was described as putting a timebomb under archaeology. Finally, in 1969, John Michells revelatory and bestselling The View over Atlantis presented a picture of ancient Britain which no archaeologist could stomach. Here was no little evidence of huge straight alignments running tens, sometimes hundreds of miles over Britain. The legends, myths, sacred sites and even the town names indicated a folk memory and a landscape etched with patterns from an ancient spiritual engineering that once covered the entire land. Ley lines, sacred geometry, dowsing and astronomical alignments became a fad. Thirty years on, these things are much more accepted by the ordinary citizen than by sceptical archaeologists. In 1948, Guy Underwood dowsed around Stonehenge, producing the above schematic of the earth energies he sensed. He also, for the first time, correctly dated the monument at 2650 BC. His book, Pattern of the Past, helped to fuel a revival in the ancient art of dowsing.
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